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Growing Organic Gardens

What is Organic Gardening?

Organic gardening is a soil-based method of growing plants that relies upon a natural balance of pest control and organic waste composting to enrich the soil and provide the proper conditions for plant growth without the use of pesticides and synthetic fertilizers.

Here on our website we present videos of some of the easiest ways we have found to produce rich organic vegetable gardens through the mixing of traditional organic composting into the soil and the utilization of horse manure for fertilization. We also feature our system to deliver efficient water to our grow beds through a grid of PVC Quick Connect piping and top-down sprinklers that are easily winterized in the fall season by a self-draining method that does not require air compressor blow-out.

How to Build a Garden Watering System

Building a Garden Watering Grid

 

Garden vegetables can be fun to grow and harvest, but when drought hits your region, watering can turn into nightmare, especially if your plants are large.  Deep watering is most important with fruiting vegetables as light watering cannot penetrate the soil deep enough to saturate the roots of these vegetables.  If left to a light sprinkle once a day, your fruit will crack, form brown or yellow spots or dry up with tip rot.  All these are the signs of nutrient or water deficiency that can be prevented with a deep watering system like our Garden watering grid.  Because the watering wand separates easily from the watering grid, this system is weather and wind resistant and can be easily and quickly winterized without the  use of an air pressure tank.  You can learn how to build a Garden Watering Grid by signing up for our video course at the links below.

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Growing Black Raspberries in Garden Beds

Growing Black Raspberry Bushes

 

If you know anything about regular Red Raspberries, they tend to take over gardens, but not with Black Raspberries.

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Growing Carrots in Garden Soil the Easy Way

Growing Carrots the Easy Way

 

Carrots are easy to grow if your soil is soft and rich in nutrients.  If your soil isn't prepared properly, your carrots will come out thin and spindly as they won't be able to expand well if your soil is too dense.

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Growing Bare Root Strawberries

 

Strawberries are some of most delicious berries you can grow in your vegetable garden. If you prepare your soil beds with heavy organic or manure compost, and plant the strawberry crowns 4 to 6 inches apart, you will be able to grow strawberries perennially from year to year.

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Growing Zucchini - Protecting Against Hail Damage

Growing Zucchini and Protecting Against Hail Damage

 

Zucchini is one of the hardiest crops you can grow as it can handle a variety of weather conditions and pests.  With prolific growth and prickly leaves, pests find zucchini leaves less desirable than other garden vegetables.  Yet, hail is one menace to zucchini that can eradicate whole crops of zucchini and vegetables alike if it strikes during the young seedling stage when all gardens are most tender.  Here in the mountain conditions of Colorado, we have found that a simple metal basket and/or garden netting placed over the seedlings for the first month of growth can make all the difference in the protecting against the early spring hail storms we often receive.

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Planting Squash and Zucchini

Planting Squash and Zucchini

 

Learn how to start zucchini and squash seeds indoors for an early start in your organic garden using Park seed's Bio Dome seed starter system. I'll show you the proper spacing for zucchini seedlings in your garden and how to water them effectively through the growing season.

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How to Start Potatoes

How to Start Potatoes

 

Potatoes are a great crop to grow in containers. If you plant spouted potatoes in early spring, they will grow quickly, beginning to provide potatoes in as early as 2 to 3 months. Learn how to start potatoes in container garden trash cans.

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How to Plant Peas

Planting Peas in Garden Soil

 

Peas are a great addition to any organic garden. They are easy to plant and grow with just a little support. Since peas are a cool weather crop, they grow well in summer in higher elevations and are best grown in late winter or early spring in warmer climates. In this video, I show you how to plant peas around the base of tomato cages which I am using to support the plants as they grow.

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How to Build a Garden Bed and Prepare the Soil

 

Enriching your garden soil with fresh manure or compost in the winter will greatly enhance the growth of your flowers and vegetables in the Spring. With the harsh winter snows we have here in Colorado (4-5 feet deep snow over my garden beds), I find that a 4-6 inch layer of fresh manure on top of my soil will decompose during the winter, providing a thick layer of mulch by springtime to reduce weeds in my garden next summer. In warmer climates, such as zone 6-8, you may want to cover your beds with a layer of clover, pea, vetch, rye, or oats plants which will keep the weeds down over winter and help to maintain soil nutrients and hydration over the winter. 

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How to Harvest and Store Potatoes

 

Potatoes are easy to store over the winter. If your soil is isn't too clumpy, you can easily bush them off prior to storage, or if you wish to wash them, just make sure that you dry them well before you place them in an open storage bin or box. To allow for proper "curing" (drying) of any damage done to the potatoes while harvesting, keep them for a minimum of two weeks in temperatures that are approximately 55-65 F degrees and humidity between 85-95 percent. After the damages have properly "cured," they can be moved to storage areas as low as 35-40 F degrees with moderate humidity and excellent ventilation which will allow them to stay fresh for up to 8 months.

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An Easy Way to Grow Potatoes

 

Digging potatoes up from the ground can be a difficult process, especially when the native ground we have in our area consists of a mix of clay and granite. Not only is container gardening with a mix of potting soil and organic waste a lot easier to work with when it comes to harvesting potatoes, it also provides them with more room to grow because the potato roots do not have to fight against the compact soil of native Colorado Rocky Mountain soil.

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